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  • Money and Credit
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  • Famous Mathematicians
     
  • Terence Chi-Shen Tao (1975-)
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  • How to Make Social Media Safer and Healthier for Children
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  • Did You Know?
    1. NASA have announced that 715 new planets circling 305 stars have been discovered outside the Earth's solar system, including four planets that are more than double the size of our own. This discovery boosts the number of known planets in our galaxy to over 1,700.
    2. Most stars in the galaxy have planets in the habitable zone.
    3. The first scientific detection of an exoplanet was in 1988. However, the first confirmed detection came in 1992; since then, and as of 1 April 2017, there have been 3,607 exoplanets discovered in 2,701 planetary systems and 610 multiple planetary systems confirmed.
    4. The Sun is over 300,000 times larger than the Earth.
    5. Sunlight takes a little more than 8 minutes to reach the Earth; this means that when we are looking at the sun as it as 8 minutes ago.
    6. It is because of gravity of the Sun and Moon we have high & low tides on the Earth.
    7. It is because of lower gravity, a person who weighs 100kg on earth would only weigh 38kg on the surface of Mars.
    8. The diameters of the Sun, the Earth and the Moon are 870,000 miles (1,391,000 kilometers), 7,926 miles (12,756 kilometers) and 2,173 miles (3,477 kilometers, respectively.
    9. Mercury, the first and smallest planet in the Solar System, speeds around the Sun in 88 Earth days, but takes almost 176 Earth days to go from sunrise to sunset. The temperatures during the day on Mercury can be 840° F; at night, the temperatures plummet to -300° F.
    10. Mercury has a very low surface gravity and has no atmosphere, which means there is no wind, no water and no air.
    11. Mercury is the least explored terrestrial or “rocky” planet in our Solar System. which formed around 4.6 billion years ago.
    12. Compared with our own Moon, which is about the same size, the Mercury planet reflects much less light. There's a lot more carbon dust thrown off from comets close to the Sun, where Mercury orbits -- about 50 times as much for Mercury as for our moon.
    13. Venus has often been described as Earth’s sister planet since the two are very similar in size and bulk composition.
    14. Venus is the second planet from the Sun, orbiting it every 224.7 Earth days. It has almost the Earth size, and is covered in thick clouds that are made mostly of carbon dioxide and acid. The surface temperature can be as high as 930° F, caused mostly by the clouds that trap the heat and reflect it back. One day on Venus is 243 Earth days, and its year is 225 Earth years.
    15. The planet Earth was formed 4.5 billion years ago before the Common Era (B.C.E).
    16. Earth is the third planet from the Sun, the densest planet in the Solar System, the largest of the Solar System's four terrestrial planets, and the only astronomical object known to accommodate life. Formed about 4.6 billion years ago, the Earth speeds around the Sun in 365 Earth days. The average temperatures on Earth is around 59° F.
    17. Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun and the second smallest planet in the Solar System. It is a “Red Planet” and the closest planet to Earth, has polar ice caps, suggesting the water is on Mars. Temperatures on Mars during the day are about 80° F, but at night drop to -270° F.
    18. Every two-year period, Mars reaches a point in its orbit called "opposition," when the planet lies directly opposite the Sun in Earth's sky. On Tuesday night, April 8, 2014, Mars, Earth and the Sun were arranged in a nearly straight line; the next "opposition" will be on May 22, 2016.
    19. Jupiter is the fifth planet from the Sun and the largest planet in the Solar System. It has no surface because it is made mostly of gasses. The average temperature on Jupiter is -235° F. Jupiter has a day that lasts 9.9 Earth hours and a year that lasts 11.9 Earth years.
    20. Saturn is the sixth planet from the Sun and the second largest planet in the Solar System, after Jupiter. It is a gas giant planet with no surface to walk on. The average temperature on Saturn is -218° F. One day on Saturn is 10 Earth hours and one year is 29.46 Earth years.
    21. Uranus, has the third-largest planetary radius and fourth-largest planetary mass in the Solar System. It is a gas giant with no surface to walk on, and is a unique planet with its blue-green color caused by the methane gas that reflects back blue and green light. Only one pole of Uranus faces the Sun, while the other is in complete darkness. One side of Uranus gets 42 years of light, followed by 42 years of darkness. Uranus has a temperature of -323° F. The average day on Uranus is 17.9 Earth hours and a year is 84 Earth years.
    22. Neptune, which is the eighth and farthest planet from the Sun in the Solar System, has many dwarf planets (i.e.; it isn’t large enough to be considered a planet). On this planet the winds blow over 1,200 miles per hour and the temperature is -350° F. One day on Neptune is equal to 19 Earth hours and one year is equal to 164.8 Earth years.
    23. Neptune, the eighth and farthest planet from the sun, has the strongest winds in the solar system; at high altitudes speeds can exceed 1,100 mph.
    24. Halley’s Comet was last seen in the inner solar system in 1986, it will be visible again from Earth sometime in 2061.
    25. Elizabeth Blackwell (1821-1910) was the first woman physician in the U.S. She received her medical degree in 1849 from Geneva Medical College in New York.
    26. The University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (former College of Philadelphia Department of Medicine), which was established on May 3, 1765, was the first medical college in the U.S. The first commencement was held June 21, 1768, when medical diplomas were presented to ten members of graduating class.
    27. Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 – 1827), a German composer and pianist, is the most admired composers in the history of Western music. Beethoven's works rank amongst the most performed of the classical music repertoire and span the transition from the Classical period to the Romantic era in classical music. Many of the pieces that he wrote are still recognized today and even used in contemporary musical compositions. Most remarkable about his career is that the infamous musician was completely deaf while continually played his music. One of Beethoven’s best-known works among modern audiences, Symphony No. 5 is known for its ominous first four notes. His ninth and final symphony, completed in 1824, is the most famous piece of music in history.
    28. Confucius (551 - 479 BCE) is China’s most famous teacher, philosopher, and political theorist, whose ideas have profoundly influenced the civilizations of China and other East Asian countries. His philosophical teachings, called Confucianism, emphasized personal and governmental morality, correctness of social relationships, justice, kindness, and sincerity. Confucianism was part of the Chinese social fabric and way of life; to Confucians, everyday life was the arena of religion.
    29. Samuel Adams (1722 – 1803), a graduate of Harvard College, was an American statesman, political philosopher, and a Founding Father of the United States. He was a leader of the American Revolution, and one of the architects of the principles of American republicanism that shaped the political culture of the United States; he served as Governor of Massachusetts in 1794. Before becoming a well-known politian Adams was an unsuccessful businessman and tax collector, who often failed to collect taxes from his fellow citizens; and he has also often been described as a brewer, but actually he worked as a maltster and not a brewer. After his death in 1803 the Boston Beer Company used Samuel Adams's name for creating the Samuel Adams Boston Lager, which became a popular award-winning brand.
    30. William Holmes McGuffey (1800 – 1873), a U. S. educator and clergyman, is remembered chiefly for his series of illustrated readers for elementary school, and is best known for writing the McGuffey Readers, the first widely used series of elementary school-level textbooks that educated millions of Americans. Mr. McGuffey helped to organize the public school system of Ohio, and served as the president of the Woodward Free Grammar School in Cincinnati, OH, one of the earliest public schools in the U.S. More than 120 million copies of McGuffey Readers were sold between 1836 and 1960. He was very fond of teaching children as he geared the books toward a younger audience. McGuffey's Readers, which was graded collections of didactic tales and excerpts from great books, reflecting his view that the proper education of young people required their introduction to a wide variety of topics and practical matters, could guide children from learning the alphabet all the way to high school materials, as each volume increased in skill level; they became standard texts in nearly all states in the U.S. since 1836.
    31. Frederick Douglass was born into slavery in Maryland, 1818. At that time, Black children were not allowed to attend school, but he understood the power and value of literacy, so, at a young age, he taught himself to read and write. He educated himself on the rights of freedom; after several unsuccessful attempts to escape slavery, he finally managed to escape when he was 20-year old. Douglass was an excellent writer and wrote several books. He was a firm believer in the equality of all peoples, white, black, female, Native American, and Chinese immigrants. He traveled throughout the northern and midwestern states, speaking on behalf of the anti-slavery movement. He successfully fought for the 13th Amendment (which abolished slavery), the 14th Amendment (which granted citizenship to those born in the United States as enslaved persons) and the 15th Amendment (which granted voting rights to men of all color — women would not gain the right to vote until the 19th Amendment in 1920).
    32. Alexander Graham Bell, the inventor of the telephone, established the Bell Telephone Company in 1879 and American Telephone and Telegraph (AT&T) Company in 1885, which acquired the Bell Telephone Company and became the primary phone company in the United States. His company (AT&T/Bell) maintained a monopoly on telephone service in the U.S. until anti-trust regulators split the company in 1982.
    33. The longest one-syllable words in the English language are "scraunched" and "strengthed" (10 letters). Some suggest that "squirreled" could be included, but squirrel is intended to be pronounced as two syllables (squir-rel) according to most dictionaries. "Screeched" and "strengths" are two other long one-syllable words, but they only have 9 letters.
    34. "Stewardesses" is the longest word that is typed with only the left hand.
    35. There are only four common words, which end in "dous", in the English language: tremendous, horrendous, stupendous, and hazardous; the other words ending in "dous" include apodous, horrendous, iodous, iridous, jeopardous, macropodous, molybdous, palladous, phyllocladous, podous, and vanadous, but they are rarely used.
    36. "Dreamt" is the only English word that ends in the letters "mt". Dreamt and dreamed are both past tense forms of dream. Dreamt is more common in Britain, while dreamed is more common in other English-speaking countries, including the U.S.
    37. There are 293 ways to make change for a dollar (e.g.; 4 quarters, 10 dimes, 20 nickels, 100 pennies, 3 quarters + 25 pennies, etc).
    38. A dime (10 cents) has 118 ridges around the edge.
    39. Most people fall asleep in 7 minutes.
    40. Just like unique finger prints, humans also possess a unique tongue print; the tongue plays an important role in our living, it performs various functions, such as helping in the mixing process of foods, containing inguinal tonsils to filter out germs, binding and contorting itself to form letters when a person speaks, and constantly pushing saliva down the throat when a person is sleeping.
    41. After eating, it takes about 6 to 8 hours for food to pass through stomach and small intestine. Food then enters the large intestine (colon) for further digestion, absorption of water and, finally, elimination of undigested food. It averagely takes about 36 hours for food to move through the entire colon.
    42. There are 206 bones in the adult human body, and a child has approximately 300 bones in the body at birth and many of these bones fuse together during he/she grows up.
    43. The right side of our body is controlled by the left side of our brain while the left side of our body is controlled by the right side of our brain.
    44. Antibiotics, which are medications that destroy or slow down the growth of bacteria, are only effective against bacteria, they won't help in fighting off a virus, and cannot treat viral infections, such as cold, flu, and most coughs.
    45. Apples, pears, summer squashes and bananas are fruits that float in water because they consist of around one quarter air by volume, a feature of their uniquely porous, relatively dry flesh.
    46. The world’s youngest university graduate was a 9-year-old Belgian student Laurent Simons. After completing high school in roughly a year, Laurent — born in Belgium but now living in the Netherlands — started college and finished the three-year bachelor’s program in electrical engineering from Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands in just nine months in early 2020. The youngest person to obtain a college degree is American Michael Kearney, who achieved the feat in June 1994 at the age of 10 years 4 months.
    47. In the U.S. parents could mail their kids to any place using the U.S. postal service until 1914. The first known case of a mailed baby was in 1913 when a couple in Ohio used the postal service to ship their 10-pound infant son to his grandmother’s home about a mile away, paying 15 cents in postage and springing for $50 in insurance (optional); however, records do not indicate whether his grandmother received her mail in a mailbox or through a letter slot. Some children were mailed much farther, hundreds of miles away, with the appropriate stamps stuck to their clothes.
    48. Vegetarians are people only eats plant-based foods, like vegetables, fruits, beans, soy, grains, rice and nuts; they don't eat meat, poultry, fish or seafood of any kind. A demi-vegetarian or semi-vegetarian is a person who does not eat meat, but eats poultry, fish or seafood.
    49. The top paid video streaming services in the U.S include NetFlix, Hulu , Amazon Prime, Comcast/Xfinity, DirecTV, Spectrum/Charter, Dish, Fios Verizon, Altice, and Cox.
    50. A shrimp’s heart is in its head; a crocodile cannot stick its tongue out; tigers have striped skin, not just striped fur; the giant squid has the largest eyes in the world; an ostrich's eye is bigger than its brain; shark is the only known fish that can blink with both eyes; a giant Panda eats around 28 pounds of bamboo a day; Kangaroos can not walk backwards; and Hummingbirds' wings can beat up to 200 times a second.
    51. Snakes do not eat any type of plant material, but small animals, including lizards, frogs, other snakes, small mammals, birds, eggs, fish, snails or insects. Because snakes cannot bite or tear their food to pieces, they must swallow prey whole.
    52. The blue whale, a marine mammal, is 98 feet (30 meters) in length and 190 tones or more in weight; it is the largest existing animal and the heaviest that has ever existed. A new born blue whale measures 20-26 feet (6.0 - 7.9 meters) long and weighs up to 6,614 pounds (3003 kg).
    53. In 2014 there were 1,864 giant pandas alive in the wild. Counting number of pandas in the wild is not an easy task. It requires a massive effort, with teams of 40 researchers spending many hours trekking through steep, mountainous bamboo forests looking for telltale signs, such as dung. When they find some, they carefully studying any bite marks to identify individual pandas because their bite marks are all unique.
    54. The rarest animals in the world:
    55. Each year, scientists discover an average of 15,000 new species, and during the past 250 years of taxonomic classification over 1.2 million species were found.
    56. Which came first, the chicken or the egg? The chicken - The scientists found that a protein found only in a chicken's ovaries is necessary for the formation of the egg; the egg can therefore only exist if it has been created inside a chicken.
    57. Only 6.7% of the world’s population holds a college degree. In the U.S., approximately one-third of all Americans hold a college degree, of which 49.8% for Asian, 27.6% for Caucasian/While, 17.3% for African American, 11.5% for Native American and 11.4% for Hispanic.
    58. There are many interesting facts about Disney's Mickey Mouse. Some of these include Mickey Mouse made his debut on November 18, 1928 in Steamboat Willie at the Colony Theatre, New York City; creating Mickey is not as simple, one cartoon could include 10,000 drawings; more than 100 Mickey cartoons were produced in the 1930s and were shown in theatres as films, newsreels and dramas and comedies; Walt Disney earned an honorary Academy award in 1932 for creating Mickey Mouse; Mickey appeared in his first appearance in colour was in The Band Concert on February 23, 1935; in 1955, Mickey Mouse made his TV debut in The Mickey Mouse Club.
    59. In the Unites States individuals are subject to federal graduated tax rates from 10% to 39.6%. Corporations are subject to federal graduated rates of tax from 15% to 35%; a rate of 34% applies to income from $335,000 to $15,000,000. State income tax rates vary from 1% to 16%, including local income tax where applicable.
    60. The Amish are a group of Christian people who choose to live very simple; they wear traditional, 18th century style clothes, and are known for reluctance to adopt many conveniences of modern technology, such as cars, televisions, and computers. In 2010 there were approximate 250,000 Amish people living in the U.S., of which over 90% lived in Pennsylvania; between 1992 and 2013, the Amish population increased by about 120%, while the US population increased by around 23%.
    61. Christian is a person who adheres to Christianity, an Abrahamic, monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus Christ. There were 2.2 billion Christians around the world in 2010, of which about 37% live in the Americas, 26% in Europe, 24% in sub-Saharan Africa, 13% in Asia and the Pacific, and 1% live in the Middle East and North Africa.
    62. Buddhism is a religion and dharma that encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and spiritual practices largely based on teachings attributed to the Buddha.  In 2010 there were about 495 million Buddhists, of which about 487 million lived in Asia, 3.9 million in North America, 1.3 million in Europe, and 1 million in the South America, Africa and the Middle East.
    63. The first microscope and the first telescope were invented in 1595 and 1608, respectively in the Netherlands.
    64. The Yongle Encyclopedia or Yongle Dadian, which was a Chinese leishu encyclopedia commissioned by the Yongle Emperor of the Ming dynasty in 1403 and completed by 1408, had its sheer scope and size that made it the world's largest general encyclopedia.
    65. Lake Mead is the largest reservoir in the United States in maximum water capacity. It is 112 miles (180 km) long when the lake is full, and 532 feet (162 m) at greatest depth, with a surface elevation of 1,221.4 feet (372.3 m) above sea level; it has 759 miles (1,221 km) of shoreline, 247 square miles (640) km of surface, and 28 million acre feet (35 km) of water when filled to capacity.
    66. On May 11, 1997, an IBM chess-playing computer, known as Deep Blue, beat world chess champion Garry Kasparov.
    67. Honda built a walking humanoid robot in 1986.
    68. In 1999 Sony designed and sold a robotic dog (AIBO) with the ability to learn, entertain and communicate with its owner.
    69. Video games can be played on a number of different platforms, which include game consoles, handheld systems, computers, mobile phones, and others. Popular game consoles that dominate current markets are Nintendo Wii, Microsoft Xbox 360 and Sony Playstation 3.
    70. Televisions first went on sale in the late 1920’s; color television sets were developed and become widespread in 1970’s, and televisions with remote controls were in the market since early 1980.
    71. Rutherford B. Hayes (March 4, 1877 – March 4, 1881) was the first president to have a telephone in the White House, installed in 1877 by Alexander Graham Bell (March 3, 1847 – August 2, 1922), who was inventing the first practical telephone.
    72. John Adams (March 4, 1797 – March 4, 1801) was the first president to live in the White House.
    73. George Washington (April 30, 1789 – March 4, 1797) was the wealthiest president, who had a net worth over half a billion in today’s dollars. He also owned many slaves but decided to free them in his will.
    74. The tallest president is Abraham Lincoln, (March 4, 1861 – April 15, 1865), who was 6'4" tall; the shortest president is James Madison, (March 4, 1809 – March 4, 1817), who was 5'4" tall; the heaviest president was William Howard Taft (March 4, 1909 – March 4, 1913), who weighted more than 300 lbs.
    75. Abraham Lincoln (March 4, 1861 – April 15, 1865) was virtually unknown in the Republican Party in 1858 when he challenged powerful U.S. Sen. Stephen Douglas (4 March 1847 – 3 June 1861) of Illinois. Lincoln lost to Douglas for the Senate but beat him in the presidential election.
    76. John Adams (March 4, 1797 – March 4, 1801) and Thomas Jefferson (March 4, 1801 – March 4, 1809) died on the same day, July 4, 1826; five years later, James Monroe (March 4, 1817 – March 4, 1825) died on July 4, 1831.
    77. Grover Cleveland was the only president to serve two nonconsecutive terms: the 22nd president (March 4, 1893 – March 4, 1897) and the 24th president (March 4, 1885 – March 4, 1889).
    78. Woodrow Wilson (March 4, 1913 – March 4, 1921) (received a PhD in history and political science from Johns Hopkins University) was the 13th President of Princeton University (1902–1910) before he was the 28th U.S. president.
    79. Many U.S. presidents had well-known nick names: Ronald Reagan) (January 20, 1981 – January 20, 1989) 's nick name is Dutch; Theodore Roosevelt (September 14, 1901 – March 4, 1909) - the Rough Rider; Woodrow Wilson (March 4, 1913 – March 4, 1921) - the Professor; Franklin D. Roosevelt (March 4, 1933 – April 12, 1945) - the Boss; Martin Van Buren (March 4, 1837 – March 4, 1841) - the Little Magician; and Abraham Lincoln (March 4, 1861 – April 15, 1865) - the Rail Splitter.
    80. There were four U.S. presidents who were assassinated while in office: Abraham Lincoln (March 4, 1861 – April 15, 1865), James Abram Garfield (March 4, 1881 – September 19, 1881), William McKinley (March 4, 1897 – September 14, 1901), and John F. Kennedy (January 20, 1961 – November 22, 1963). There were other attempts, the latest being attempts on the lives of U.S. presidents included Truman (April 12, 1945 – January 20, 1953), Gerald Ford (August 9, 1974 – January 20, 1977), and Ronald Reagan (January 20, 1981 – January 20, 1989).
    81. There were four U.S. presidents who were passed away while in office. They died because of sickness. William Henry Harrison (March 4, 1841 – April 4, 1841) died in 1841 - pneumonia and pleurisy; Zachary Taylor (March 4, 1849 – July 9, 1850) died in 1850 - acute gastroenteritis; Warren G. Harding (March 4, 1921 – August 2, 1923) died in 1923 - heart attack; Franklin D. Roosevelt) (March 4, 1933 – April 12, 1945) died in 1945 - cerebral hemorrhage.
    82. In the U.S., the president, who is elected by the entire country and serves a four-year term, is the head of the executive branch, which makes laws official. The president appoints or removes cabinet members and high level officials.
    83. In the U.S., Senate there are 100 senators (two from each state) elected by their states and serve six-year terms. The U.S. vice president is considered the head of the Senate, but does not vote in the Senate unless there is a tie.
    84. The Senate approves nominations made by the President to the Cabinet, the Supreme Court, federal courts and other important posts.
    85. In the U.S., House of Representatives there are 435 representatives elected by their states and serve two-year terms. The Speaker of the House, elected by the representatives, is considered the head of the House.
    86. If the U.S. president does not believe the bill is good for the country, he does not sign it; this is called a veto. However, with enough votes the legislative branch (U.S. Senate and U.S. House of Representatives) can override the President's veto, and the bill becomes a law.
    87. Virginia is the birth state of the most presidents.
    88. San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge, completed in 1937, has become one of the most internationally recognized symbols of the U.S. It was designed by Joseph B. Strauss, and has the second longest suspension bridge main span (4,200 feet) in the U.S, after the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge in New York City.
    89. The Cathedral of St. John the Divine (in New York City), which was begun to build in 1892 and was completed in 2008, is the largest cathedral in the world: 601-ft wide at the nave and 320-ft wide at the transept.
    90. Rockefeller Center, in New York City, occupies more than 22 acres and has 19 building.
    91. The Eiffel Tower, in Paris, was built for the Exposition of 1989 by Alexandre Gustave Eiffel. It is 984-ft. high (1,056 ft.; including the television tower).
    92. The Taj Mahal (1632-1650), at Agra, India, built by Shah Jahan as a tomb for his wife, is one of the most beautiful building in the world.
    93. The Great Sphinx of Egypt, one of the wonders of ancient Egyptian architecture, adjoins the pyramids of Giza and has a length of 240 ft. Built in the 4th dynasty, it is approximately 4,500 years old.
    94. Angkor Wat (outside the city of Angkor Thom, Cambodia), which was built during the 12th century, is one of the most beautiful of Cambodian or Khmer architecture.
    95. The Great Wall of China (228 B.C.E.), which was built mainly of soil/sand and stone, is 1,400 miles long and varies in height between 18 to 30 ft. Designed specifically as a defense against nomadic tribes, it has many large watch towers.
    96. Wiley Post took a Lockheed Vega aircraft, Winnie Mae, 15,596 miles to fly solo around the world in 7 days, 18 hours, 49.5 min (July 15-22, 1933).
    97. Twelve astronauts have walked on the moon. They are Eugene A. Cernan & Harrison H. Schmitt (Apollo 17, December 7-19, 1972), John W. Young & Charles M. Duke (Apollo 16, April 16-27, 1972), David R. Scott and James B. Irwin (Apollo 15, July 26-August, 1971), Alan B. Shepard, Jr. & Edgar D. Mitchell (Apollo 14, January 31-February 9, 1971), Charles P. Conrad& Alan L. Bean (Apollo 12, November 14-24, 1969), Neil A. Armstrong & Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr. (Apollo 11, July 16-24, 1969)
    98. Recent data collected by the Hubble Space Telescope suggests that the universe is around eight billion years old.
    99. The U.S. is the fourth largest gold-producing nation (242,000 kgs), the Republic of South Africa led the world in gold production (272,128 kgs) following by China (247,200 kgs), Australia (247,000 kgs); the other countries have large gold production are Peru (203,268 kgs), Russia (159,340 kgs) and Canada (104,198 kgs).
    100. Karl Benz (1844-1929) and Gottlieb Daimler (184-1900) were the first people who invented the gasoline-powered automobile. They worked independently, unaware of each other's endeavors
    101. Guglielmo Marconi (1874-1937), of Bologna, Italy, was the first person to prove that radio signals could be sent over long distances. In 1906, the American inventor Lee de Forest (1873-1961) built a device that made voice radio practical.
    102. The American Philo T. Farnsworth (1906-1971), one of television pioneers, was the first person to propose that pictures could be televised electronically.
    103. The most influential physicians in history:
    104. People and Discoveries:

    Timeline World History
    1. 13th Millennium BC · 13,000–12,001 BC
    2. 12th Millennium BC · 12,000–11,001 BC
    3. 11th Millennium BC · 11,000–10,001 BC
    4. 10th Millennium BC · 10,000–9001 BC
    5. 9th Millennium BC · 9000–8001 BC
    6. 8th Millennium BC · 8000–7001 BC
    7. 7th Millennium BC · 7000–6001 BC
    8. 6th Millennium BC · 6000–5001 BC
    9. 5th Millennium BC · 5000–4001 BC
    10. 4th Millennium BC · 4000–3001 BC
    11. 3rd Millennium BC · 3000–2001 BC
    12. 2nd Millennium BC · 2000–1001 BC
    13. 1st Millennium BC · 1000–1 BC
    14. 1st Millennium · AD 1–1000
    15. 2nd Millennium · AD 1001–2000
    16. 3rd Millennium · AD 2001–3000

    Science, Technology & Universe
    1. Space for Kids | ESA
    2. NASA Universe
    3. NASA Science for Kids
    4. NASA Science
    5. Science and Technology | NASA
    6. NASA Kid's Club
    7. NASA for Kids and Families
    8. Astronomy for Kids
    9. Space Activities
    10. International Space Station on Stream
    11. Earth Views from the Space Station
    12. Unidentified Flying Object (UFO)
    13. UFO Stories
    14. Earth, Sun and Moon
    15. Sun, Moon and Earth Orbits
    16. Lunar Eclipses for Beginners
    17. History of Science and Technology
    18. Understanding Facial Recognition Software
    19. Understanding Artificial Intelligence
    20. The Science Behind Self-Driving Cars
    21. Journey to Deepest Space (video)
    22. Hunting for Life on another Planet (video)
    23. Future Spaceship Power & Propulsion (video)
    24. From the Big Bang to the Present Day (video)
    25. Monster of the Milky Way (video)
    26. Biggest Black Holes and other Cosmic Monsters (video)
    27. The Year of Pluto (video)
    28. Mars 2015 (video)
    29. Mars Underground: Space Station on Mars (video)
    30. 30 Minutes to Mars (video)
    31. Mission to Mars (video)
    32. The Biggest Stars In The Universe (video)
    33. Venus - The Earth’s “Sister Planet”
    34. Solar System
    35. NASA Telescope Reveals Record-Breaking Exoplanet Discovery
    36. Exoplanets: Worlds Beyond Our Solar System
    37. Kepler Finds 1st Earth-Size Planet In 'Habitable Zone' of Another Star
    38. Universe - Exoplanets
    39. NASA Just Discovered Seven New Exoplanets
    40. Exoplanet Exploration: Planets Beyond our Solar System
    41. NASA Estimates 1 Billion ‘Earths’ in Our Galaxy Alone
    42. Scientists Discover 12 New Potential Earth-like Planets
    43. Kepler Space Telescope Spies a ‘Mega-Earth’
    44. NASA’s Kepler Telescope Doubles Number of Known Planets Outside Solar System
    45. Kepler Space Telescope Finds Earth-size, Potentially Habitable Planets Are Common
    46. Newly Found Star System Has 5 Earth-sized Planets, the Oldest Ever Seen in the Milky Way
    47. Do We Really Want to Know If We’re Not Alone in the Universe?
    48. Interesting Facts About the Planets
    49. Biographies for Kids: Scientists and Inventors
    50. The White Hat Guide to Australian Inventions, Discoveries & Innovations.
    51. Life-Changing Science Discoveries
    52. Australia - Invention and Science Discoveries
    53. How the Universe Works (video)
    54. How the Universe Works (24 Shows)
    55. How to Build a Galaxy
    56. What Is an Eclipse? | NASA
    57. What We Know About UFOs
    58. What Happened Before the Big Bang (video)
    59. 2 New Exoplanets Are More Earth-Like
    60. 5 Famous Scientists That Started Their Work as Young Teens.
    61. 7 Earth-Size Planets Orbit Dwarf Star
    62. 10 Greatest Inventions of Our Time.
    63. 10 Technologies that Have Changed the Way We Live
    64. 10 of the Latest Inventions to Make Life a Little Easier
    65. 20 Inventions We Wouldn't Have Without Space Travel

    American Memory Timeline
    1. Colonial Settlement, 1600's -1763.
    2. The American Evolution, 1763-1783.
    3. Revolutionary War: Groping Toward Peace, 1781-1783
    4. The New Nation, 1783 - 1815.
    5. National Expansion and Reform, 1815-1880.
    6. Civil War and Reconstruction, 1861-1877
    7. Rise of Industrial America, 1876-1900
    8. Progress Era to New Era, 1900-1929
    9. Great Depression and World War II, 1929-1945
    10. The Postwar United States, 1945-1968

    100 Greatest Britons
    (BBC Poll, 2002)

    1. - Sir Winston Churchill, (1874-1965) - Prime Minister (1940-1945, 1951–1955)
    2. - Isambard Kingdom Brunel, (1806–1859) - Engineer.
    3. - Diana, Princess of Wales (1961–1997) - First wife of Charles, Prince of Wales, & mother of Prince William & Prince Harry of Wales.
    4. - Charles Darwin (1809–1882) - Naturalist; the originator of the theory of evolution through natural selection & author of 'On the Origin of Species'.
    5. - William Shakespeare (1564–1616) - English poet & playwright.
    6. - Sir Isaac Newton (1643–1727) - Mathematician, physicist, astronomer, natural philosopher, & alchemist.
    7. - Queen Elizabeth I of England (1533-1603) - Monarch (reigned 1558-1603).
    8. - John Lennon (1940–1980) - Musician with The Beatles.
    9. - Vice-Admiral Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson (1758–1805) - Naval commander.
    10. - Oliver Cromwell (1599–1658) - Lord Protector.
    11. - Ernest Shackleton (1874–1922) - Polar explorer.
    12. - Captain James Cook (1728–1779) - Explorer.
    13. - Lord Robert Baden-Powell, 1st Baron Baden-Powell (1857–1941) - Boy Scouts & Girl Guides founder.
    14. - King Alfred the Great (849?–899) - King of Wessex (reigned 871–899).
    15. - Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington (1769–1852) - Military commander, statesman & Prime Minister 1828–1830 & 1834.
    16. - Margaret Thatcher (Baroness Thatcher) (1925-2013) - Prime Minister (1979–1990).
    17. - Michael Crawford (1942-) - Actor & singer.
    18. - Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom (1819–1901) - Monarch (reigned 1837–1901).
    19. - Sir Paul McCartney (1942-) - Musician with The Beatles.
    20. - Sir Alexander Fleming (1881–1955) - Biologist, pharmacologist, discoverer of penicillin.
    21. - Alan Turing OBE (1912–1954) - Pioneer of computing.
    22. - Michael Faraday (1791–1867) - Scientist.
    23. - Owain Glyndwr (1359–1416) - Prince of Wales.
    24. - Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom (1926-) - Reigning monarch (from 1952).
    25. - Professor Stephen Hawking (1942 - ) - Theoretical physicist.
    26. - William Tyndale (1494–1536) - English translator of the Bible.
    27. - Emmeline Pankhurst (1858–1928) - Suffragette.
    28. - William Wilberforce (1759–1833) - Humanitarian.
    29. - David Bowie (1947- ) - Musician.
    30. - Guy Fawkes (1570–1606) - English revolutionary.
    31. - Leonard Cheshire (Baron Cheshire of Woodall) (1917–1992) - Aviator & charity organiser.
    32. - Eric Morecambe OBE (1926–1984) - Comedian.
    33. - David Beckham (1975- ) - Footballer.
    34. - Thomas Paine (1737–1809) - Political philosopher.
    35. - Boudicca (died c.60) - Leader of Celtic resistance to Roman Empire.
    36. - Sir Steve Redgrave (1962- ) - Olympic rower.
    37. - Sir Thomas More (1478–1535) - English saint, lawyer & politician.
    38. - William Blake (1757–1827) - Author, poet, painter & printer.
    39. - John Harrison (1693–1776) - Clock designer.
    40. - King Henry VIII of England (1491–1547) - Monarch (reigned 1509–1547).
    41. - Charles Dickens (1812–1870) - Author.
    42. - Sir Frank Whittle (1907–1996) - Jet engine inventor.
    43. - John Peel (1939–2004) - Broadcaster.
    44. - John Logie Baird (1888–1946) - Television pioneer.
    45. - Aneurin Bevan (1897–1960) - Labour politician, helped in formation of the National Health Service.
    46. - Boy George (1961- ) - Musician with Culture Club.
    47. - Sir Douglas Bader (1910–1982) - Aviator & charity campaigner.
    48. - William Wallace (c.1270–1305) - Guardian of Scotland.
    49. - Sir Francis Drake (c.1540–1596) - English naval commander.
    50. - John Wesley (1703–1791) - Methodism founder.
    51. - King Arthur - Celtic monarch of legend.
    52. - Florence Nightingale (1820–1910) - Nurse.
    53. - T.E. Lawrence (Lawrence of Arabia) (1888–1935) - Soldier & arabist.
    54. - Captain Robert Falcon Scott (1868–1912) - Polar explorer.
    55. - Enoch Powell (1912–1998) - Politician.
    56. - Sir Cliff Richard (1940-) - Musician.
    57. - Sir Alexander Graham Bell (1847–1922) - Telephone pioneer.
    58. - Freddie Mercury (1946–1991) - Musician with band Queen.
    59. - Dame Julie Andrews (1935-) - Actress & singer.
    60. - Edward Elgar (1857–1934) - Composer.
    61. - Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother, (1900–2002) - Queen consort.
    62. - George Harrison (1943–2001) - Musician with The Beatles.
    63. - Sir David Attenborough (1926-) - Broadcaster.
    64. - James Connolly (1868–1916) - Scottish born leader of the Irish 1916 rising.
    65. - George Stephenson (1781–1848) - Railway pioneer.
    66. - Sir Charles (Charlie) Chaplin (1889–1977) - Comic actor, film director.
    67. - Tony Blair (1953-) - Prime Minister (1997–2007).
    68. - William Caxton (c.1415~1422–c.1492) - English printer.
    69. - Bobby Moore OBE (1941–1993) - Footballer; Captain of England 1966 World Cup winning team.
    70. - Jane Austen (1775–1817) - Author.
    71. - William Booth (1829–1912) - Founder of Salvation Army.
    72. - King Henry V of England (1387–1422) - Monarch (reigned 1413–1422).
    73. - Aleister Crowley (1875–1947) - Occultist, writer, social provocateur; founder of Thelema.
    74. - King Robert the Bruce (1274–1329) - King of Scots.
    75. - Bob Geldof KBE (1951-) - Irish musician, philanthropist.
    76. - The Unknown Warrior - Soldier of the Great War.
    77. - Robbie Williams (1974 - ) - Musician; previous member of Take That.
    78. - Edward Jenner (1749–1823) - Pioneer of vaccination.
    79. - David Lloyd George (1st Earl Lloyd George of Dwyfor ) (1863–1945) - Prime Minister (1916–1922).
    80. - Charles Babbage (1791–1871) - Computing pioneer & mathematician.
    81. - Geoffrey Chaucer (c.1343–1400) - Medieval author.
    82. - King Richard III of England (1452–1485) - Monarch (reigned 1483–1485).
    83. - JK Rowling OBE (1965 - ) - Harry Potter Series author.
    84. - James Watt (1736–1819) - Steam engine developer.
    85. - Sir Richard Branson (1950 - ) - Businessman.
    86. - Bono (1960 - ) - Irish musician (Singer for Rock Band U2), and philanthropist.
    87. - John Lydon (Johnny Rotten) (1956 - ) - Musician.
    88. - Field Marshal Montgomery (Bernard Law Montgomery), 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein (1887–1976) - Military commander.
    89. - Donald Campbell (1921–1967) - Water speed world record challenger.
    90. - King Henry II of England (1133–1189) - Monarch (reigned 1154–1189).
    91. - James Clerk Maxwell (1831–1879) - Physicist.
    92. - JRR Tolkien (1892–1973) - Author & philologist.
    93. - Sir Walter Raleigh (1552–1618) - English explorer.
    94. - King Edward I of England (1239–1307) - Monarch (reigned 1272–1307).
    95. - Sir Barnes Neville Wallis (1887–1979) - Aviation technology pioneer.
    96. - Richard Burton (1925–1984) - Actor.
    97. - Tony Benn (1925-) - Politician; formerly 2nd Viscount Stangate.
    98. - David Livingstone (1813–1873) - Missionary & explorer.
    99. - Professor Tim Berners-Lee - Internet pioneer & World Wide Web inventor.
    100. - Marie Stopes (1880–1958) - Birth control promoter.

    Games, Toys and Safety Tips
    1. Toy Safety
    2. Toy Safety Tips
    3. Toys Safety Tips | boston.gov
    4. Toy Safety Tips | Children's Hospital Pittsburgh
    5. Toy Safety for Babies
    6. Toy Safety Tips for Infants and Toddlers
    7. Toy Safety Tips for Toddlers
    8. Toy Safety Tips for Kids of All Ages
    9. Toy Safety Guidelines to Keep Your Child Safe
    10. Toy Guidelines to Keep Child Safe
    11. Top Tips for Toy Safety
    12. Basic Tips to Keep Children in Child Care Safe Outdoors
    13. Toy Buying Tips for Babies & Young Children
    14. Safety Games for Kids Make Learning Fun
    15. Safety Activities & Fun Ideas for Kids
    16. Healthy Eating Games and Activities
    17. Choosing Safe Toys (for Parents)
    18. Toy Buying Tips for Babies & Young Children
    19. U.S. Safety Standards
    20. Good Toys for Young Children by Age and Stage
    21. Baby Safety: Car, Toys, Choking, Falls, Sleeping, and More
    22. Is Your Teen Addicted to Games?
    23. Important Safety Rules to Teach Your Children
    24. Safety Education Materials | CPSC.gov
    25. Toy Safety Tips: How to Keep Your Kids Safe
    26. Laser Toys: How to Keep Kids Safe
    27. Toy Safety Tips: How to Pick the Right Toy
    28. How to Buy Safe Toys
    29. 6 Toy Safety Tips All Parents Should Know
    30. 10 Toy Safety Tips for Babies and Toddlers

    Songs of Poetry

    All About Airplanes


    A Statistical Comparison: China vs. United States

    Area

    China United States
    Population 1.385B (2018) 329M (2018)
    GDP $10,098 per Capita (2019) $65,115 per Capita (2019)
    Revenues $3.312 trillion (Ranked 2nd) $6.028 trillion (Ranked 1st)
    Taxes Corporate: 25%; Income: 0%-45% Corporate: 21% (Fed), 0-12% (State/Local); Income: 10%-37% (Fed), 0%-13% (State/Local)
    Account Balance $164,900 million (surplus - 2017) - $464,200 million (deficit - 2017)
    Internet Users 840 million  (58.80%) (2017) 244 million Users (75.23%) (2017)
    Number of Cell-phones 1.474 billion (2017) 396 million (2017)
    Cable TV Subscribers 264 million (2015) 98 million (2015)
    Airline Passengers 552.1 million (2017) 849.3 million million (2017)
    Foreign Visitors 62.9 million (1.6 million from USA) (2018) 76.9 million (2.9 million from China) (2018)
    Private Cars 185.17 million (2017) 268.8 million (2018)
    Deaths in Traffic Accidents 256,180 (2018) 39,888 (2018)
    Medical Doctors 3.4 million (2018) 1,005,295 (2019)
    Feature Films Produced 902 (2018) 786 (2019)

    (More)



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