eMacromall.Com - Kid's Places
Dictionary
 
Look Up: Dictionary Thesaurus
Kid's Learning
· Country Facts
· Earthquake
· Discovery
· House Representatives
· Info Please
· Kids in The House
· Little Lawyers
· NASA Science
· Nobel Prizes
· Olympic
· PBS-Kids
· Senate
· United Nations
· U.S. Presidents
· White House
 
 
  • Sikid
  • Baby Songs
  • Baby Universe
  • Chicken of the Sea
  • Food & Nutrition Fun
  • History Channel
  • Kids Click
  • Looney
  • NASA Kid's Club
  • Raising Kids
  • Science for Kids
  • Science Trek
  • Zoo Book
  • 2000 Freebies
  •  
    Understanding & Learning

  • What Is Copyright?
  • U.S. Copyright Laws
  • Taking the Mystery Out Of Copyright
  • Patents & Trademarks
  • Patents, Copyrights, and Trademarks
  • Trademark and Other Intellectual Property Resource Guide
  • Copyright and Primary Sources
  • Introduction to Intellectual Property
  • Bankruptcy
  • What Is a Trade Secret?
  • Government Agency For Kids
  • Government Guide For Kids
  •  
     
  • U.S. Government


  • K id 's P la c e s f o r F u n & L e a r n i n g

    eDirectory

    Did You Know?
    1. NASA have announced that 715 new planets circling 305 stars have been discovered outside the Earth's solar system, including four planets that are more than double the size of our own. This discovery boosts the number of known planets in our galaxy to over 1,700.
    2. The first scientific detection of an exoplanet was in 1988. However, the first confirmed detection came in 1992; since then, and as of 1 April 2017, there have been 3,607 exoplanets discovered in 2,701 planetary systems and 610 multiple planetary systems confirmed.
    3. In the Unites States individuals are subject to federal graduated tax rates from 10% to 39.6%. Corporations are subject to federal graduated rates of tax from 15% to 35%; a rate of 34% applies to income from $335,000 to $15,000,000. State income tax rates vary from 1% to 16%, including local income tax where applicable.
    4. The Amish are a group of Christian people who choose to live very simple; they wear traditional, 18th century style clothes, and are known for reluctance to adopt many conveniences of modern technology, such as cars, televisions, and computers. In 2010 there were approximate 250,000 Amish people living in the U.S., of which over 90% lived in Pennsylvania; between 1992 and 2013, the Amish population increased by about 120%, while the US population increased by around 23%.
    5. Christian is a person who adheres to Christianity, an Abrahamic, monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus Christ. There were 2.2 billion Christians around the world in 2010, of which about 37% live in the Americas, 26% in Europe, 24% in sub-Saharan Africa, 13% in Asia and the Pacific, and 1% live in the Middle East and North Africa.
    6. Buddhism is a religion and dharma that encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and spiritual practices largely based on teachings attributed to the Buddha.  In 2010 there were about 495 million Buddhists, of which about 487 million lived in Asia, 3.9 million in North America, 1.3 million in Europe, and 1 million in the South America, Africa and the Middle East.
    7. Each year, scientists discover an average of 15,000 new species, and during the past 250 years of taxonomic classification over 1.2 million species were found.
    8. Which came first, the chicken or the egg? The chicken - The scientists found that a protein found only in a chicken's ovaries is necessary for the formation of the egg; the egg can therefore only exist if it has been created inside a chicken.
    9. The first microscope and the first telescope were invented in 1595 and 1608, respectively in the Netherlands.
    10. The Yongle Encyclopedia or Yongle Dadian, which was a Chinese leishu encyclopedia commissioned by the Yongle Emperor of the Ming dynasty in 1403 and completed by 1408, had its sheer scope and size that made it the world's largest general encyclopedia.
    11. Most stars in the galaxy have planets in the habitable zone.
    12. Neptune, the eighth and farthest planet from the sun, has the strongest winds in the solar system; at high altitudes speeds can exceed 1,100 mph.
    13. There are 206 bones in the adult human body, and a child has approximately 300 bones in the body at birth and many of these bones fuse together during he/she grows up.
    14. Snakes do not eat any type of plant material, but small animals, including lizards, frogs, other snakes, small mammals, birds, eggs, fish, snails or insects. Because snakes cannot bite or tear their food to pieces, they must swallow prey whole.
    15. The blue whale, a marine mammal, is 98 feet (30 meters) in length and 190 tones or more in weight; it is the largest existing animal and the heaviest that has ever existed. A new born blue whale measures 20-26 feet (6.0 - 7.9 meters) long and weighs up to 6,614 pounds (3003 kg).
    16. Lake Mead is the largest reservoir in the United States in maximum water capacity. It is 112 miles (180 km) long when the lake is full, and 532 feet (162 m) at greatest depth, with a surface elevation of 1,221.4 feet (372.3 m) above sea level; it has 759 miles (1,221 km) of shoreline, 247 square miles (640) km of surface, and 28 million acre feet (35 km) of water when filled to capacity.
    17. Alexander Graham Bell, the inventor of the telephone, established the Bell Telephone Company in 1879 and American Telephone and Telegraph (AT&T) Company in 1885, which acquired the Bell Telephone Company and became the primary phone company in the United States. His company (AT&T/Bell) maintained a monopoly on telephone service in the U.S. until anti-trust regulators split the company in 1982.
    18. Every two-year period, Mars reaches a point in its orbit called "opposition," when the planet lies directly opposite the Sun in Earth's sky. On Tuesday night, April 8, 2014, Mars, Earth and the Sun were arranged in a nearly straight line; the next "opposition" will be on May 22, 2016.
    19. The Sun is over 300,000 times larger than the Earth.
    20. Mercury is the least explored terrestrial or “rocky” planet in our Solar System. which formed around 4.6 billion years ago.
    21. Venus has often been described as Earth’s sister planet since the two are very similar in size and bulk composition.
    22. Halley’s Comet was last seen in the inner solar system in 1986, it will be visible again from Earth sometime in 2061.
    23. It is because of lower gravity, a person who weighs 100kg on earth would only weigh 38kg on the surface of Mars.
    24. Sunlight takes a little more than 8 minutes to reach the Earth; this means that when we are looking at the sun as it as 8 minutes ago.
    25. Compared with our own Moon, which is about the same size, the Mercury planet reflects much less light. There's a lot more carbon dust thrown off from comets close to the Sun, where Mercury orbits -- about 50 times as much for Mercury as for our moon.
    26. Mercury, the first and smallest planet in the Solar System, speeds around the Sun in 88 Earth days, but takes almost 176 Earth days to go from sunrise to sunset. The temperatures during the day on Mercury can be 840° F; at night, the temperatures plummet to -300° F.
    27. Venus is the second planet from the Sun, orbiting it every 224.7 Earth days. It has almost the Earth size, and is covered in thick clouds that are made mostly of carbon dioxide and acid. The surface temperature can be as high as 930° F, caused mostly by the clouds that trap the heat and reflect it back. One day on Venus is 243 Earth days, and its year is 225 Earth years.
    28. Earth is the third planet from the Sun, the densest planet in the Solar System, the largest of the Solar System's four terrestrial planets, and the only astronomical object known to accommodate life. Formed about 4.6 billion years ago, the Earth speeds around the Sun in 365 Earth days. The average temperatures on Earth is around 59° F.
    29. Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun and the second smallest planet in the Solar System. It is a “Red Planet” and the closest planet to Earth, has polar ice caps, suggesting the water is on Mars. Temperatures on Mars during the day are about 80° F, but at night drop to -270° F.
    30. Jupiter is the fifth planet from the Sun and the largest planet in the Solar System. It has no surface because it is made mostly of gasses. The average temperature on Jupiter is -235° F. Jupiter has a day that lasts 9.9 Earth hours and a year that lasts 11.9 Earth years.
    31. Saturn is the sixth planet from the Sun and the second largest planet in the Solar System, after Jupiter. It is a gas giant planet with no surface to walk on. The average temperature on Saturn is -218° F. One day on Saturn is 10 Earth hours and one year is 29.46 Earth years.
    32. Uranus, has the third-largest planetary radius and fourth-largest planetary mass in the Solar System. It is a gas giant with no surface to walk on, and is a unique planet with its blue-green color caused by the methane gas that reflects back blue and green light. Only one pole of Uranus faces the Sun, while the other is in complete darkness. One side of Uranus gets 42 years of light, followed by 42 years of darkness. Uranus has a temperature of -323° F. The average day on Uranus is 17.9 Earth hours and a year is 84 Earth years.
    33. Neptune, which is the eighth and farthest planet from the Sun in the Solar System, has many dwarf planets (i.e.; it isn’t large enough to be considered a planet). On this planet the winds blow over 1,200 miles per hour and the temperature is -350° F. One day on Neptune is equal to 19 Earth hours and one year is equal to 164.8 Earth years.
    34. The diameters of the Sun, the Earth and the Moon are 870,000 miles (1,391,000 kilometers), 7,926 miles (12,756 kilometers) and 2,173 miles (3,477 kilometers, respectively.
    35. It is because of gravity of the Sun and Moon we have high & low tides on the Earth.
    36. On May 11, 1997, an IBM chess-playing computer, known as Deep Blue, beat world chess champion Garry Kasparov.
    37. Honda built a walking humanoid robot in 1986.
    38. In 1999 Sony designed and sold a robotic dog (AIBO) with the ability to learn, entertain and communicate with its owner.
    39. Video games can be played on a number of different platforms, which include game consoles, handheld systems, computers, mobile phones, and others. Popular game consoles that dominate current markets are Nintendo Wii, Microsoft Xbox 360 and Sony Playstation 3.
    40. Televisions first went on sale in the late 1920’s; color television sets were developed and become widespread in 1970’s, and televisions with remote controls were in the market since early 1980.
    41. Rutherford B. Hayes (March 4, 1877 – March 4, 1881) was the first president to have a telephone in the White House, installed in 1877 by Alexander Graham Bell (March 3, 1847 – August 2, 1922), who was inventing the first practical telephone.
    42. John Adams (March 4, 1797 – March 4, 1801) was the first president to live in the White House.
    43. George Washington (April 30, 1789 – March 4, 1797) was the wealthiest president, who had a net worth over half a billion in today’s dollars. He also owned many slaves but decided to free them in his will.
    44. The tallest president is Abraham Lincoln, (March 4, 1861 – April 15, 1865), who was 6'4" tall; the shortest president is James Madison, (March 4, 1809 – March 4, 1817), who was 5'4" tall; the heaviest president was William Howard Taft (March 4, 1909 – March 4, 1913), who weighted more than 300 lbs.
    45. Abraham Lincoln (March 4, 1861 – April 15, 1865) was virtually unknown in the Republican Party in 1858 when he challenged powerful U.S. Sen. Stephen Douglas (4 March 1847 – 3 June 1861) of Illinois. Lincoln lost to Douglas for the Senate but beat him in the presidential election.
    46. John Adams (March 4, 1797 – March 4, 1801) and Thomas Jefferson (March 4, 1801 – March 4, 1809) died on the same day, July 4, 1826; five years later, James Monroe (March 4, 1817 – March 4, 1825) died on July 4, 1831.
    47. Grover Cleveland was the only president to serve two nonconsecutive terms: the 22nd president (March 4, 1893 – March 4, 1897) and the 24th president (March 4, 1885 – March 4, 1889).
    48. Woodrow Wilson (March 4, 1913 – March 4, 1921) (received a PhD in history and political science from Johns Hopkins University) was the 13th President of Princeton University (1902–1910) before he was the 28th U.S. president.
    49. Many U.S. presidents had well-known nick names: Ronald Reagan) (January 20, 1981 – January 20, 1989) 's nick name is Dutch; Theodore Roosevelt ) (September 14, 1901 – March 4, 1909) - the Rough Rider; Woodrow Wilson (March 4, 1913 – March 4, 1921) - the Professor; Franklin D. Roosevelt) (March 4, 1933 – April 12, 1945) - the Boss; Martin Van Buren ) (March 4, 1837 – March 4, 1841) - the Little Magician; and Abraham Lincoln (March 4, 1861 – April 15, 1865) - the Rail Splitter.
    50. There were four U.S. presidents who were assassinated while in office: Abraham Lincoln (March 4, 1861 – April 15, 1865), James Abram Garfield (March 4, 1881 – September 19, 1881), William McKinley (March 4, 1897 – September 14, 1901), and John F. Kennedy (January 20, 1961 – November 22, 1963), There were other attempts, the latest being attempts on the lives of U.S. presidents included Truman (April 12, 1945 – January 20, 1953), Gerald Ford (August 9, 1974 – January 20, 1977), and Ronald Reagan (January 20, 1981 – January 20, 1989).
    51. There were four U.S. presidents who were passed away while in office. They died because of sickness. William Henry Harrison (March 4, 1841 – April 4, 1841) died in 1841 - pneumonia and pleurisy; Zachary Taylor (March 4, 1849 – July 9, 1850) died in 1850 - acute gastroenteritis; Warren G. Harding (March 4, 1921 – August 2, 1923) died in 1923 - heart attack; Franklin D. Roosevelt) (March 4, 1933 – April 12, 1945) died in 1945 - cerebral hemorrhage.
    52. In the U.S., the President, who is elected by the entire country and serves a four-year term, is the head of the executive branch, which makes laws official. The President appoints or removes cabinet members and high level officials.
    53. In the U.S., Senate there are 100 senators (two from each state) elected by their states and serve six-year terms. The U.S. Vice President is considered the head of the Senate, but does not vote in the Senate unless there is a tie.
    54. The Senate approves nominations made by the President to the Cabinet, the Supreme Court, federal courts and other important posts.
    55. In the U.S., House of Representatives there are 435 representatives elected by their states and serve two-year terms. The Speaker of the House, elected by the representatives, is considered the head of the House.
    56. If the U.S. President does not believe the bill is good for the country, he does not sign it; this is called a veto. However, with enough votes the legislative branch (U.S. Senate and U.S. House of Representatives) can override the President's veto, and the bill becomes a law.
    57. Virginia is the birth state of the most presidents.
    58. San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge, completed in 1937, has become one of the most internationally recognized symbols of the U.S. It was designed by Joseph B. Strauss, and has the second longest suspension bridge main span (4,200 feet) in the U.S, after the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge in New York City.
    59. The Cathedral of St. John the Divine (in New York City), which was begun to build in 1892 and was completed in 2008, is the largest cathedral in the world: 601-ft wide at the nave and 320-ft wide at the transept.
    60. Rockefeller Center, in New York City, occupies more than 22 acres and has 19 building.
    61. The Eiffel Tower, in Paris, was built for the Exposition of 1989 by Alexandre Gustave Eiffel. It is 984-ft. high (1,056 ft.; including the television tower).
    62. The Taj Mahal (1632-1650), at Agra, India, built by Shah Jahan as a tomb for his wife, is one of the most beautiful building in the world.
    63. The Great Sphinx of Egypt, one of the wonders of ancient Egyptian architecture, adjoins the pyramids of Giza and has a length of 240 ft. Built in the 4th dynasty, it is approximately 4,500 years old.
    64. Angkor Wat (outside the city of Angkor Thom, Cambodia), which was built during the 12th century, is one of the most beautiful of Cambodian or Khmer architecture.
    65. The Great Wall of China (228 B.C.E.), which was built mainly of soil/sand and stone, is 1,400 miles long and varies in height between 18 to 30 ft. Designed specifically as a defense against nomadic tribes, it has many large watch towers.
    66. The planet Earth was formed 4.5 billion years ago before the Common Era (B.C.E).
    67. Wiley Post took a Lockheed Vega aircraft, Winnie Mae, 15,596 miles to fly solo around the world in 7 days, 18 hours, 49.5 min (July 15-22, 1933).
    68. Twelve astronauts have walked on the moon. They are Eugene A. Cernan & Harrison H. Schmitt (Apollo 17, December 7-19, 1972), John W. Young & Charles M. Duke (Apollo 16, April 16-27, 1972), David R. Scott and James B. Irwin (Apollo 15, July 26-August, 1971), Alan B. Shepard, Jr. & Edgar D. Mitchell (Apollo 14, January 31-February 9, 1971), Charles P. Conrad& Alan L. Bean (Apollo 12, November 14-24, 1969), Neil A. Armstrong & Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr. (Apollo 11, July 16-24, 1969)
    69. Recent data collected by the Hubble Space Telescope suggests that the universe is around eight billion years old.
    70. Based on the 2006 gold-producing country data, the U.S. was the fourth largest gold-producing nation (242,000 kgs). The Republic of South Africa led the world in gold production (272,128 kgs) . The other top countries were: China (247,200 kgs), Australia (247,000 kgs), Peru (203,268 kgs), Russia (159,340 kgs) and Canada (104,198 kgs).
    71. The University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (former College of Philadelphia Department of Medicine), which was established on May 3, 1765, was the first medical college in the U.S. The first commencement was held June 21, 1768, when medical diplomas were presented to ten members of graduating class.
    72. Elizabeth Blackwell (1821-1910) was the first woman physician in the U.S. She received her medical degree in 1849 from Geneva Medical College in New York.
    73. Karl Benz (1844-1929) and Gottlieb Daimler (184-1900) were the first people who invented the gasoline-powered automobile. They worked independently, unaware of each other's endeavors
    74. Guglielmo Marconi (1874-1937), of Bologna, Italy, was the first person to prove that radio signals could be sent over long distances. In 1906, the American inventor Lee de Forest (1873-1961) built a device that made voice radio practical.
    75. The American Philo T. Farnsworth (1906-1971), one of television pioneers, was the first person to propose that pictures could be televised electronically.
    76. People and Discoveries:

    Science, Technology & Universe
    1. BBC - Schools Science Clips - Earth, Sun and Moon
    2. Sun, Moon and Earth Orbits
    3. Lunar Eclipses for Beginners
    4. What Is an Eclipse? - NASA
    5. History of Science and Technology
    6. Understanding Facial Recognition Software
    7. Understanding Artificial Intelligence
    8. The Science Behind Self-Driving Cars
    9. Journey to Deepest Space (video)
    10. Hunting for Life on another Planet (video)
    11. Future Spaceship Power & Propulsion (video)
    12. From the Big Bang to the Present Day (video)
    13. What Happened Before the Big Bang (video)
    14. Monster of the Milky Way (video)
    15. Biggest Black Holes and other Cosmic Monsters (video)
    16. The Year of Pluto (video)
    17. Mars 2015 (video)
    18. Mars Underground: Space Station on Mars (video)
    19. 30 Minutes to Mars (video)
    20. Mission to Mars (video)
    21. The Biggest Stars In The Universe (video)
    22. How the Universe Works (video)
    23. How the Universe Works (24 shows)
    24. Venus - The Earth’s “Sister Planet”
    25. Solar System
    26. NASA Telescope Reveals Record-Breaking Exoplanet Discovery
    27. Exoplanets: Worlds Beyond Our Solar System
    28. Kepler Finds 1st Earth-Size Planet In 'Habitable Zone' of Another Star
    29. Universe - Exoplanets
    30. 7 Earth-Size Planets Orbit Dwarf Star
    31. NASA Just Discovered Seven New Exoplanets
    32. Exoplanet Exploration: Planets Beyond our Solar System
    33. NASA Estimates 1 Billion ‘Earths’ in Our Galaxy Alone
    34. Scientists Discover 12 New Potential Earth-like Planets
    35. Kepler Space Telescope Spies a ‘Mega-Earth’
    36. NASA’s Kepler Telescope Doubles Number of Known Planets Outside Solar System
    37. Kepler Space Telescope Finds Earth-size, Potentially Habitable Planets Are Common
    38. Newly Found Star System Has 5 Earth-sized Planets
    39. Two New Exoplanets Are More Earth-like than any We’ve Found Before
    40. Do We Really Want to Know If We’re Not Alone in the Universe?
    41. Interesting Facts About the Planets
    42. Biographies for Kids: Scientists and Inventors
    43. Life-Changing Science Discoveries
    44. The White Hat Guide to Australian Inventions, Discoveries & Innovations.
    45. Australia - Inventiveness and Science Discoveries
    46. 5 Famous Scientists That Started Their Work as Young Teens.
    47. What Are the 10 Greatest Inventions of Our Time?.

    American Memory Timeline
    1. Colonial Settlement, 1600's -1763.
    2. The American Evolution, 1763-1783.
    3. The New Nation, 1783 - 1815.
    4. National Expansion and Reform, 1815-1880.
    5. Civil War and Reconstruction, 1861-1877
    6. Rise of Industrial America, 1876-1900
    7. Progress Era to New Era, 1900-1929
    8. Great Depression and World War II, 1929-1945
    9. The Postwar United States, 1945-1968

    100 Greatest Britons
    (BBC Poll, 2002)

    1. - Sir Winston Churchill, (1874-1965) - Prime Minister (1940-1945, 1951–1955)
    2. - Isambard Kingdom Brunel, (1806–1859) - Engineer.
    3. - Diana, Princess of Wales (1961–1997) - First wife of Charles, Prince of Wales, & mother of Prince William & Prince Harry of Wales.
    4. - Charles Darwin (1809–1882) - Naturalist; the originator of the theory of evolution through natural selection & author of 'On the Origin of Species'.
    5. - William Shakespeare (1564–1616) - English poet & playwright.
    6. - Sir Isaac Newton (1643–1727) - Mathematician, physicist, astronomer, natural philosopher, & alchemist.
    7. - Queen Elizabeth I of England (1533-1603) - Monarch (reigned 1558-1603).
    8. - John Lennon (1940–1980) - Musician with The Beatles.
    9. - Vice-Admiral Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson (1758–1805) - Naval commander.
    10. - Oliver Cromwell (1599–1658) - Lord Protector.
    11. - Ernest Shackleton (1874–1922) - Polar explorer.
    12. - Captain James Cook (1728–1779) - Explorer.
    13. - Lord Robert Baden-Powell, 1st Baron Baden-Powell (1857–1941) - Boy Scouts & Girl Guides founder.
    14. - King Alfred the Great (849?–899) - King of Wessex (reigned 871–899).
    15. - Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington (1769–1852) - Military commander, statesman & Prime Minister 1828–1830 & 1834.
    16. - Margaret Thatcher (Baroness Thatcher) (1925-2013) - Prime Minister (1979–1990).
    17. - Michael Crawford (1942-) - Actor & singer.
    18. - Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom (1819–1901) - Monarch (reigned 1837–1901).
    19. - Sir Paul McCartney (1942-) - Musician with The Beatles.
    20. - Sir Alexander Fleming (1881–1955) - Biologist, pharmacologist, discoverer of penicillin.
    21. - Alan Turing OBE (1912–1954) - Pioneer of computing.
    22. - Michael Faraday (1791–1867) - Scientist.
    23. - Owain Glyndwr (1359–1416) - Prince of Wales.
    24. - Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom (1926-) - Reigning monarch (from 1952).
    25. - Professor Stephen Hawking (1942 - ) - Theoretical physicist.
    26. - William Tyndale (1494–1536) - English translator of the Bible.
    27. - Emmeline Pankhurst (1858–1928) - Suffragette.
    28. - William Wilberforce (1759–1833) - Humanitarian.
    29. - David Bowie (1947- ) - Musician.
    30. - Guy Fawkes (1570–1606) - English revolutionary.
    31. - Leonard Cheshire (Baron Cheshire of Woodall) (1917–1992) - Aviator & charity organiser.
    32. - Eric Morecambe OBE (1926–1984) - Comedian.
    33. - David Beckham (1975- ) - Footballer.
    34. - Thomas Paine (1737–1809) - Political philosopher.
    35. - Boudicca (died c.60) - Leader of Celtic resistance to Roman Empire.
    36. - Sir Steve Redgrave (1962- ) - Olympic rower.
    37. - Sir Thomas More (1478–1535) - English saint, lawyer & politician.
    38. - William Blake (1757–1827) - Author, poet, painter & printer.
    39. - John Harrison (1693–1776) - Clock designer.
    40. - King Henry VIII of England (1491–1547) - Monarch (reigned 1509–1547).
    41. - Charles Dickens (1812–1870) - Author.
    42. - Sir Frank Whittle (1907–1996) - Jet engine inventor.
    43. - John Peel (1939–2004) - Broadcaster.
    44. - John Logie Baird (1888–1946) - Television pioneer.
    45. - Aneurin Bevan (1897–1960) - Labour politician, helped in formation of the National Health Service.
    46. - Boy George (1961- ) - Musician with Culture Club.
    47. - Sir Douglas Bader (1910–1982) - Aviator & charity campaigner.
    48. - William Wallace (c.1270–1305) - Guardian of Scotland.
    49. - Sir Francis Drake (c.1540–1596) - English naval commander.
    50. - John Wesley (1703–1791) - Methodism founder.
    51. - King Arthur - Celtic monarch of legend.
    52. - Florence Nightingale (1820–1910) - Nurse.
    53. - T.E. Lawrence (Lawrence of Arabia) (1888–1935) - Soldier & arabist.
    54. - Captain Robert Falcon Scott (1868–1912) - Polar explorer.
    55. - Enoch Powell (1912–1998) - Politician.
    56. - Sir Cliff Richard (1940-) - Musician.
    57. - Sir Alexander Graham Bell (1847–1922) - Telephone pioneer.
    58. - Freddie Mercury (1946–1991) - Musician with band Queen.
    59. - Dame Julie Andrews (1935-) - Actress & singer.
    60. - Edward Elgar (1857–1934) - Composer.
    61. - Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother, (1900–2002) - Queen consort.
    62. - George Harrison (1943–2001) - Musician with The Beatles.
    63. - Sir David Attenborough (1926-) - Broadcaster.
    64. - James Connolly (1868–1916) - Scottish born leader of the Irish 1916 rising.
    65. - George Stephenson (1781–1848) - Railway pioneer.
    66. - Sir Charles (Charlie) Chaplin (1889–1977) - Comic actor, film director.
    67. - Tony Blair (1953-) - Prime Minister (1997–2007).
    68. - William Caxton (c.1415~1422–c.1492) - English printer.
    69. - Bobby Moore OBE (1941–1993) - Footballer; Captain of England 1966 World Cup winning team.
    70. - Jane Austen (1775–1817) - Author.
    71. - William Booth (1829–1912) - Founder of Salvation Army.
    72. - King Henry V of England (1387–1422) - Monarch (reigned 1413–1422).
    73. - Aleister Crowley (1875–1947) - Occultist, writer, social provocateur; founder of Thelema.
    74. - King Robert the Bruce (1274–1329) - King of Scots.
    75. - Bob Geldof KBE (1951-) - Irish musician, philanthropist.
    76. - The Unknown Warrior - Soldier of the Great War.
    77. - Robbie Williams (1974 - ) - Musician; previous member of Take That.
    78. - Edward Jenner (1749–1823) - Pioneer of vaccination.
    79. - David Lloyd George (1st Earl Lloyd George of Dwyfor ) (1863–1945) - Prime Minister (1916–1922).
    80. - Charles Babbage (1791–1871) - Computing pioneer & mathematician.
    81. - Geoffrey Chaucer (c.1343–1400) - Medieval author.
    82. - King Richard III of England (1452–1485) - Monarch (reigned 1483–1485).
    83. - JK Rowling OBE (1965 - ) - Harry Potter Series author.
    84. - James Watt (1736–1819) - Steam engine developer.
    85. - Sir Richard Branson (1950 - ) - Businessman.
    86. - Bono (1960 - ) - Irish musician (Singer for Rock Band U2), and philanthropist.
    87. - John Lydon (Johnny Rotten) (1956 - ) - Musician.
    88. - Field Marshal Montgomery (Bernard Law Montgomery), 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein (1887–1976) - Military commander.
    89. - Donald Campbell (1921–1967) - Water speed world record challenger.
    90. - King Henry II of England (1133–1189) - Monarch (reigned 1154–1189).
    91. - James Clerk Maxwell (1831–1879) - Physicist.
    92. - JRR Tolkien (1892–1973) - Author & philologist.
    93. - Sir Walter Raleigh (1552–1618) - English explorer.
    94. - King Edward I of England (1239–1307) - Monarch (reigned 1272–1307).
    95. - Sir Barnes Neville Wallis (1887–1979) - Aviation technology pioneer.
    96. - Richard Burton (1925–1984) - Actor.
    97. - Tony Benn (1925-) - Politician; formerly 2nd Viscount Stangate.
    98. - David Livingstone (1813–1873) - Missionary & explorer.
    99. - Professor Tim Berners-Lee - Internet pioneer & World Wide Web inventor.
    100. - Marie Stopes (1880–1958) - Birth control promoter.

    Games, Toys and Safety Tips


    Kids' Learning & Fun Places

    ABC Family
    Aboriginal Art
    Alfy
    Alloy
    All Math
    American Girl
    Aplus Math
    Art History
    Asian Art
    Ask Jeeves Kids
    Astronauts
    Barbie
    Berenstain Bears
    Black Board
    Bored
    Brain Pop
    Bubbles
    Carmen San Diego
    Cards Up
    Cartoon Network
    CBC Kids
    CEC
    Children Defense Fund
    Child Fun
    Chop
    Cool Math
    Crayola
    Cyber Kids
    Cyberteens
    Discovery
    Discovery.ca
    Disney
    Disney Games
    Disney Junior
    Dodo Land
    Dr. Seuss's
    Earth Dog
    Edmentum
    Education Place
    Enchanted Learning
    eToys
    Exploratorium
    FAO
    Fun Brain
    Game Kids
    Go
    Guinness World Records
    Gurl
    Hot Wheels
    How Stuff Works
    Impressionism
    Intellicast
    Judy & David
    Karscot
    Kelloggs
    Kennedy Center
    Kid's Astronomy
    Kid at Art
    Kid's Corner
    Kid Fun
    Kid Info
    Kidscom
    Kid Link
    Kids Love A Mystery
    Kid's Health
    Knowledge Adventure
    Learning Games for Kids
    Lego
    Lego Mind Storms
    Let's Find Out
    Liberty's Kids
    Lissa Explains
    Lycos
    Lucas Arts
    Marlo Thomas
    Marvel
    Match Box
    Math
    Math Forum
    Missing Kids
    Mowa
    Monsters
    Muppet Central
    NCTM
    Nat'l Chidren's Museum
    National Geographic Kids
    Neatstuff
    Nelvana
    Neopets
    Nick
    Nick Jr.
    Nintendo
    On Health
    Parenthood
    PBS Kids
    Pojo
    Poke Order
    Project Know
    Proquest K-12
    San Diego Zoo
    Scholastic
    Science Kids
    SEDS
    Sega
    SFSKid
    Sesame Workshop
    SI Kids
    Smithsonian
    Space Camp
    Spoonful
    Stanlee
    STSI
    Stupid
    Teachers
    Teen Hollywood
    Teletubbies (BBC)
    The Kidz Page
    Time for Kids
    TomMo
    ToonaCat
    Twin Sisters
    UNICEF
    Universal Uclick
    Upto Ten
    U.S. Mint
    U.S. Toy
    Whale Times
    Wonka
    Word Central


    Education & Entertainment


    Time For Kids

    Songs of Poetry


     Kid's Stores
    Stores Description
    A Fun Zone
    Abercrombie Kids
    Animenation
    AreYouGame
    Baby Center
    Baby Age
    Baby Bag
    Barbie
    BarbiePC
    Build a Bear
    Carter's
    Children's Place
    Cookie's Kids
    Crazy 8
    Compoz A Puzzle
    Creative Plaything
    Cribs 2 Go
    Disney
    Disney World
    Disney Store
    Disney Store
    Doodle Hopper
    e-Kid's Center
    eToys
    Family Wonder
    FAO Schwarz
    Fisher Price
    French Toast
    Gap Kids
    Grow Kid Grow
    Gymboree
    Growth Spurts
    Guiding-L-Video
    Gymboree
    H & M
    Hot Wheels
    Internet Protect
    iParty
    Kids City
    Kid Essentials
    Kids Foot Locker
    Kid Fresh
    Kids n Play
    Kids O
    Kid to Kid
    Kids Village
    Mattel
    Naartjie Kids
    Net Nanny
    Once Upon a Child
    Oriental Trading
    OshKosh B'Gosh
    Peapods
    Pottery Barn Kids
    Pumpkin Patch USA
    Red Rocket
    Right Start
    Rooms To Go Kids
    Ruum
    Shockwave
    Sports Illustrated
    Stride Rite
    Toy Box Covers
    Toysrus
    Zippy Kid Store
    Zulily

    All About Airplanes

    Videogame Systems

    Video Games



    A Statistical Comparison: China vs. United States

    Area

    China United States
    Population 1,37B (2015) 321M (2015)
    GDP $11 trillion ($8,028k per Capita - 2015) $118 trillion ($56,115k per Capita - 2015)
    Revenues $1.86 trillion (Ranked 3rd) $2.45 trillion (Ranked 1st)
    Taxes 3% - 45% 10% - 39.6% (Fed); 1% - 16% (State); 0% - 3% (Local)
    Account Balance $23.93 billion (surplus - 2017) - $504 billion (deficit - 2017)
    Internet Users 50.3 per 100 people 74.55 per 100 people
    Number of Cell-phones 93 per 100 people (2015) 118 per 100 people (2015)
    Cable TV Subscribers 264 million (2015) 98 million (2015)
    Airline Passengers 436.18 million (2015) 895.5 million (2015)
    Foreign Visitors 56.9 million (8% from USA) 77.5 million (1.5% from China)
    Private Cars 172 million (2015) 263.6 million (2015)
    Deaths in Traffic Accidents 200,000 (2015) 38,300 (2015)
    Medical Doctors 2.89 million (2014) 926,120 (2016)
    Feature Films Produced 638 (2013) 738 (2013)

    (More)



         Site Index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z | # |
    Copyright © 1997-2017 - eMacromall.com - All rights reserved.